Climate, fuel and social justice

Science for PEOPLE 70s socialist science magazine

Some old copies of Science for People – the magazine of the British Society for Social Responsibility in Science – landed on my desk a couple of weeks ago. I’ve been lost down archives of the 1970s radical science movement ever since. The following comes from the editorial in issue 25 in 1974.

Energy supply is seen as a purely technical problem to be solved by “experts” with a technical fix: nuclear fission and North Sea oil. These, we are told, will satisfy energy “demand” for the next twenty years. After that, we will only have plutonium waste and memories of the beauty of northwest Scotland. The most important questions are never asked: why will the “demand” for energy continue to grow? Do we really need so much energy? Technical answers will never solve the energy problem, since the problem, short or long term, is not technical but social and political. Cheap and abundant energy, chiefly oil, has been essential for the policy of sustained economic growth that has been pursued by all political parties (and the TUC) since the end of the Second World War. Economic growth has enabled the capitalist system to survive and evolve into its present interventionist, mildly social democratic form, by buying off and suppressing class conflict. The conditions which made it possible no longer hold: commodity prices have greatly increased, the international monetary system is in chaos, the balance of payments deficit is enormous, and oil is neither abundant nor cheap. Policies are polarising, the class structure of Britain is exposed and we must choose either authoritarian capitalism or socialism

I share it partly because aspects of it remind me of a debate on social justice and climate change I chaired last week as part of the Brighton Fringe (video below). The point about a choice between “authoritarian capitalism or socialism” was less overt, but there were aspects of a similar tension running through it, as was a sense that relying on simply technical answers would be foolish, because many of the speakers saw the problem as chiefly political. Or in some contrast, Myles Allen went full technofix in the Mail on Sunday over the weekend.

I don’t know if the similarities in these discourses say something depressing about lack of progress in energy policy or our ways of critiquing it. For all that I generally agree that issues of energy supply are political, not technical (and, moreover, the technical is political) it did feel like the scientific and technical issues were drowned out at that event. I also think that 21st century nuclear should be accessed on 21st century terms, not 1970s ones. Maybe I’m wrong about that though. You can watch for yourself.

Thanks to our panel (Thurstan Crockett, Jim Watson, Doug Parr and Kirsty Alexander) as well as Julia Day for putting it all together. Thanks also to Jon Agar for drawing this Science for People editorial to my attention.

2 thoughts on “Climate, fuel and social justice

  1. Ali TT

    Listened to the debate and agree that the technical/scientific was lost among the political & social. Were there many scientists and techies in the audience though? Seems reasonable that debates around nuclear/fracking would concentrate around the political, social and economic areas more than the technical. It would be nice when arguing about nuclear or shale as an alternative to our current fossil fuel use that arguments would be made in that context, rather than concentrating solely on the negatives of each. If either are a viable alternative, then there will be an inevitable trade-off between the positives and negatives of future and current. No solution will please all people all of the time, and by focusing on the downsides we risk paralysis.

    The debate around energy efficiency, particularly in households and business properties, was somewhat disappointing but perhaps outside the expertise of the panelists? In this area there really is an interesting discussion to be had between the technical, social, economic and (to a lesser extent) political. There has been a mis-match between the expectations of those designing energy-efficient technologies & the end-user operation, although I think the situation is getting better.

    Reply
  2. Pingback: How A Group Of Brits Changed The World By Changing Science In The 1970s - FunaGram

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